Portrait Society of America 2015

A Few Highlights from this year's conference.

Some of my photos didn't save properly, so I have very few. Below are 3 demonstrations that I loved. 

A beautiful head by Jeffery Hein. His best head was during the other session, but I lost the picture. Jeff gave a great presentation during inspirational hour on sunday morning. He's one of my favorite artists to watch every year because I feel the same anxiety watching him start a painting that I experience during my own painting process...and then he always pulls it off, so it gives me hope that my strange starts are ok. Jeff took almost 2 years off from his already successful painting career to study intensely so that his skill level would match his desire to create religious paintings. 

A beautiful head by Jeffery Hein. His best head was during the other session, but I lost the picture. Jeff gave a great presentation during inspirational hour on sunday morning. He's one of my favorite artists to watch every year because I feel the same anxiety watching him start a painting that I experience during my own painting process...and then he always pulls it off, so it gives me hope that my strange starts are ok. Jeff took almost 2 years off from his already successful painting career to study intensely so that his skill level would match his desire to create religious paintings. 

Michelle Dunaway, who was new to me this year, painted the same model as Jeff. For this painting she used Richard Schmid's selective start method. The idea is that you start at one point and work out, being sure that each addition is correct, and voila, you have a painting. I would not recommend this for someone who was not already very advanced at drawing. This isn't like the mushing around and adjusting that I like to do but you can get very delicate and fresh looking results. 

Michelle Dunaway, who was new to me this year, painted the same model as Jeff. For this painting she used Richard Schmid's selective start method. The idea is that you start at one point and work out, being sure that each addition is correct, and voila, you have a painting. I would not recommend this for someone who was not already very advanced at drawing. This isn't like the mushing around and adjusting that I like to do but you can get very delicate and fresh looking results. 

This is one of the studies produced by Quang Ho during the conference. Quang Ho is always my most favorite to watch because it seems like the painting just manifests from nowhere.  Look at those beautiful "Rembrandt Hands." Quang actually said "Hm maybe I'll do like Rembrandt hands on him" and made about 12 strokes and there they were. Something that I loved that Quang repeated from David Leffel was that "my brush never touches the canvas." Meaning that only the paint on the tip of the bristles should touch the canvas, and making it all about making strokes with juicy paint, not just scrubbing around with the brush.

This is one of the studies produced by Quang Ho during the conference. Quang Ho is always my most favorite to watch because it seems like the painting just manifests from nowhere.  Look at those beautiful "Rembrandt Hands." Quang actually said "Hm maybe I'll do like Rembrandt hands on him" and made about 12 strokes and there they were. Something that I loved that Quang repeated from David Leffel was that "my brush never touches the canvas." Meaning that only the paint on the tip of the bristles should touch the canvas, and making it all about making strokes with juicy paint, not just scrubbing around with the brush.